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Sunday, April 26, 2020 | History

7 edition of Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England found in the catalog.

Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England

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Published by Bowling Green State University Popular Press in Bowling Green, Ohio .
Written in

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Medicine -- England -- History -- 17th century,
    • Traditional medicine -- England -- History -- 17th century

    • Edition Notes

      StatementDoreen Evenden Nagy.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsR486 .N34 1988
      The Physical Object
      Pagination140 p. ;
      Number of Pages140
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2067017M
      ISBN 100879724358, 0879724366
      LC Control Number88070523


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Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England by Doreen Evenden Download PDF EPUB FB2

Popular Medicine in Seventeenth-Century England Hardcover – January 1, by Doreen Evenden Nagy (Author)Cited by: This monograph, the first detailed study of seventeenth-century popular medicine, depicts the major role which lay or popular medical practitioners played in the provision of seventeenth-century.

Medicine in Seventeenth Century England: A Symposium Held at UCLA in Honor of C. O'Malley Hardcover – January 1, by ed. Debus, Allen G. (Author)Cited by: 9. Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England book Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green State University Popular Press Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; internetarchivebooks; Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England book Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation Contributor Internet Archive Language English.

This monograph, the first detailed study of seventeenth-century popular medicine, depicts the major role which lay or popular medical practitioners played in the provision of seventeenth-century health care in Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England book.

Popular Medicine in Seventeenth-Century England. Doreen Evenden Nagy. Popular Press. Media & bookseller inquiries regarding review copies, events, and interviews can be directed to the publicity department at [email protected] or () (If you want to examine a book for possible course use, please see our Course Books page.

Doreen E. Nagy, Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England, Bowling Green University Popular Press,8vo, pp. $, (paperback). Vol Issue 3 Andrew Wear. “Anne Stobart offers us an engaging and penetrating analysis of how households in the sixteenth and seventeenth century dealt with sickness and ill health.

Household Medicine in Seventeenth-Century England is an innovative and rich investigation of how domestic and commercial medical care were combined to treat diseases in this period.

She reveals in unprecedented detail the. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by : Andrew Wear.

Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England. Wear A. Medical History, 01 Jul33(3): Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England. and in cooperation with the National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England book, Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England / Doreen Evenden Nagy Bowling Green State University Popular Press Bowling Green, Ohio Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required.

Exploring the literary remains (diaries, sermons, commonplace Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England book of Henry Newcome and Philip Henry, both Presbyterian ministers, in the north of England, Harley delivers a forensic examination of the relationships between providential theology in the latter part of the seventeenth century and godly attitudes towards sickness and medicine.

Writes: British History, History of Science, Technology and Medicine, Social History, Ancient Greek History, Popular medicine in seventeenth-century England book Roman History. Author of: Household Medicine in Seventeenth-Century England. Editor(s) of: Critical Approaches to the History of Western Herbal Medicine.

17th Century. Harvey to van Leeuwenhoek. 17th century medicine was, unfortunately, still handicapped by wrong ideas about the human body. Most doctors still thought that there were four fluids (or "humors") in the body: blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile (pictured right) and illness was believed to result from an excess of one humor.

However, during the 17th century, a more scientific. Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England. Astrology, witchcraft, magical healing, divination, ancient prophecies, ghosts, and fairies were taken very seriously by people at all social and economic levels in sixteenth- 4/5(9).

the seventeenth century.7 II At the opening of the seventeenth century the state of medical studies in the universities was such that further reforms were urgently needed. Though facilities for the study of medicine and surgery at Oxford and Cambridge had been increased during the previous century, they were still inadequate.

This article is an extended review of Margaret Spufford's Small Books and Pleasant Histories, an account of the English chapbook. It argues that while Spufford has made an interesting attempt to penetrate the world of seventeenth‐century English popular culture, she is, in the final analysis, unsuccessful.

Spufford's account of the chapbook is compared with recent work on other popular Author: Barry Reay. Joseph Binns, Surgeon to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, Medical case-book, Binns’s casebook covers his practice from and has been examined thoroughly by Lucinda McCray Beier in Lucinda McCray Beier, “A London Surgeon’s Career: Joseph Binns,” in Sufferers.

In Praise of Scribes is a major contribution to manuscript studies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. With case studies ranging from anonymous scribes to Sir Philip Sidney, John Donne, and Katherine Philips, this profusely illustrated book shows what wide-ranging use can be made of material evidence, and helps to define the nature of manuscript culture in this period.

Wear, ‘Medical Practice in Late Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Century England: Continuity and Union’, in R. French and A. Wear (eds), The Medical Revolution of the Seventeenth Century (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ), p. Cited by: 2. Peter A. Krivatsy, A Catalogue of Seventeenth Century Printed Books in the National Library of Medicine () John B.

Blake, A Short Title Catalogue of Eighteenth Century Printed Books in the National Library of Medicine () Dorothy M. Schullian, A Catalogue of Incunabula and Manuscripts in the Army Medical Library ().

“ English Science in Seventeenth Century England,” Scientific Literature in 16th and 17th Century England (Los Angeles, ), pp. 23 – New England's First Fruits (London, ) reprinted in Morison, Founding, pp.

–emphasized their public declamations in Greek and Latin and their logical and philosophical. Sorry, our data provider has not provided any external links therefore we are unable to provide a link to the full : Andrew Wear. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages ; 23 cm: Contents: Introduction: Popular culture in early modern England / Barry Reay --Popular culture in seventeenth-century London / Peter Burke --Popular culture in seventeenth-century Bristol / Jonathan Barry --Popular religion / Barry Reay --Reform of popular culture?Sex and marriage in early modern England.

Another influence on seventeenth-century medicine was Galenism, which, like Aristotelianism, embraced more than the concepts developed by Galen in the second century A.D. His works demonstrated a search for facts (although colored by preconceptions), a vigorous disrespect for authority (although he did worship Hippocrates), and a strong desire.

His Canon of Medicine was considered the highest medical authority until well into the 17th century. Pharmacopeia was also altered by cultural contacts made during the Crusades. Heavily sweetened and spiced concoctions made from exotic materials became popular, and distillation was employed for the first time to extract alcohol and essential oils.

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health. Mystical Bedlam. Madness, anxiety, and healing in seventeenth-century England. Reviewed by W. Bynum. Author information Author: W. Bynum. Improvement was a new concept in seventeenth-century England; only then did it become usual for people to think that the most effective way to change things for the better was not a revolution or a return to the past, but the persistent application of human ingenuity to the challenge of increasing the country's wealth and general wellbeing.

Improvements in agriculture and industry, commerce. Beier, Sufferers and Healers: The Experience of Illness in Seventeenth Century England (London: Routledge & Keegan Paul, ). An Almanack (Cambridge, ), sig. B4r Pond.

(source: Nielsen Book Data) Summary Mystical Bedlam explores the social history of insanity of early seventeenth-century England by means of a detailed analysis of the records of Richard Napier, a clergyman and astrological physician, who treated over.

These sources can teach the scholar about the nature of daily life in rural and urbanizing New England, the monetary value accorded to medical services, and the prevalence (or irrelevance) of currency.

Seventeenth-century sources, in particular, lend personal detail to. Book Review Free Preview Archive Mystical Bedlam: Madness, anxiety, and healing in seventeenth-century england The Germ of Laziness: Rockefeller philanthropy and public health in the New South.

seen in the practice of medicine, even during the mid s when this book was written. For example, the author excluded from her analysis the decline of magic and folk medicine as alternatives during the seventeenth-century, and the relegation of magic and supernatural healing to marginalized and persecuted activities in England by Also.

Curth gives a straightforward survey of the genre of almanacs in seventeenth-century England; Capp’s chapter is a study of the relationship between science and astrology in English almanacs in the same period; Grafton is an introduction to the practice of astrological medicine.

and Popular Medicine: (Manchester University Press. During the last fifteen years, a series of semi-independent intellectual trends have come together to transform the history of what society has thought about madness and how it has treated those it considers mad.

Once upon a time, the history of medicine was regarded, like that of pure science, as largely “internalist,” a story [ ]. In this book, one of England’s most distinguished historians explores the causes and consequences of the English Revolution, the years from to when the triumph of Protestantism encouraged a questioning of authority in English political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual life.

This pioneering book explores for the first time how ordinary women of the early modern period in England understood and experienced their bodies. Using letters, popular literature, and detailed legal records from courts that were obsessively concerned with regulating morals, the book recaptures seventeenth-century popular understandings of sex.

Continuity in Seventeenth-Century England (London, I), pp. ; R. Roberts, "The Personnel and Practice of Medicine in Tudor and Stuart England", Medical Hist., v (), pp.

From his study of the medical case-books of Sir Richard Napier, Dr. MacDonald has concluded that obstetric and gy4aecological disorders. The research of Professor J. Roberts has interested me for several years. It has interested me because he has been working in a really rich area of intellectual history.

Even before Professor Whitehead taught us to speak of the seventeenth century as the "century of genius," many of us lookedBrand: Springer Netherlands. Witchcraft, astrology, divination, and every kind of popular magic flourished in England during the 16th and 17th centuries, from the belief that a blessed amulet could prevent the assaults of the Devil to the use of the same charms to recover stolen goods.

Today pdf welcome Dr. Sara Read, whose book, Menstruation and the Female Body in Seventeenth-Century England is out today. I, for one, already have it on my wish list! So, please give a warm welcome to Sara, and enjoy the fascinating topic she brings to The Seventeenth Century Lady!/5(9).Chapter 15 Book Quiz #2.

STUDY. Flashcards. Download pdf. Write. Spell. Test. PLAY. Match. Gravity. Created by. katlahr. Terms in this set (25) Which of the following elements were featured in the typical seventeenth-century opera? Dance, drama, and spectacular scenery. Principia Mathematica (), which synthesized the laws of movement and universal.ebook Working ebook of Women in the Seventeenth Century, originally published inwas the first comprehensive analysis of the daily lives of ordinary women in early modern remains the most wide ranging introduction to the subject.

Clark uses a variety of documentary sources to illuminate the experience of women in the :